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Slime Mould Plasmodium 1 Location Images

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  • Slime Mould Plasmodium 1 Location Images

    The plasmodium of this slime mould is the asexual form. This colony was found on birch bark and handed to me. These are location images. "Studio" images from a day later show changes and will be uploaded tomorrow.

    The stereos are crosseye. Although the depth of most of the oganism is tiny, they do work.

    Olympus EM-1, (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, 1/100 at f8 ISO 800, hand-held.

    Harold









    Last edited by Harold Gough; 9th December 2019, 05:07 PM.
    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

  • #2
    3D's work well despite shallow depth...470 sexes, how does that work then Harold...………….

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
      3D's work well despite shallow depth...470 sexes, how does that work then Harold...………….
      Thanks, Mark.

      I don't know how it works but deciding which one an individual wishes to identify as could be a full time occupation.

      It's a good thing that they don't need toilets!

      Harold
      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post

        Thanks, Mark.

        I don't know how it works but deciding which one an individual wishes to identify as could be a full time occupation.

        It's a good thing that they don't need toilets!

        Harold
        And can't go shopping...…………...

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        • #5
          I thought I was going to see some images taken through a microscope

          Is this another slime mould. I remember amoeba-like cells live freely and then coalesce to create composite structures or colonies?

          Ian
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Ian View Post
            I thought I was going to see some images taken through a microscope

            Is this another slime mould. I remember amoeba-like cells live freely and then coalesce to create composite structures or colonies?

            Ian
            Yes, Ian, those are the organisms. (I've just realised that you were thinking of the malaria parasite. Same name, different kingdom).

            I have posted images of several species in Foto Fair over several years. I tend to post them outside of the plant and fungus string as they are, as you say, neither. All of those other species would have been as sexual stage fruiting bodies. occasionally sitting on some plasmodium.

            As for microscopes, spores are boring and I work at magnifications down to FOV 3.5mm wide with macro lenses. It his case, the low magnification is more relevant

            Harold
            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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            • #7
              Very interesting.
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              Learn something new every day

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