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Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

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  • Phill D
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Been a bit busy lately so only just caught up with this. What a great learning thread guys, well done everyone. This ought to be a sticky I'd say.

    Leave a comment:


  • blu-by-u
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by OM USer View Post
    .... I notice a slight blip where the roads in the forground bend a bit sharpish......
    It was only a 5 min job. I am still learning what I can do with the software and your photos cam in handy.

    now that you mentioned it, I think it's caused by the straightening.

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  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by blu-by-u View Post
    I have copied with permission the photos by OM USER and did a stitch using Affinity Photo.
    Henry, thank you for putting in the time and effort.

    Originally posted by blu-by-u View Post
    [1] With this, I did a pincushion correction. ie, I push the center bulge back. I did not correct the slant and by the time I cropped the wave off and the slant, there wasn't much left.

    [2]Same photo same stitching but this time, I corrected the waves individually. then I rotated the image clockwise just a few degrees, then using the wrap function, I stretch the photo slightly at the 2 ends.
    These look very good with regards to matching the tones, white balance, and brightness. Much better than I managed manually. The centre looks very good in #1. I like the 2nd one better overall (really this is down to that path out of the car park looking a bit straighter) although I notice a slight blip where the roads in the forground bend a bit sharpish. I streched the ends on mine a little as well, just to bring the people back into the usual shape.

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  • blu-by-u
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    I have copied with permission the photos by OM USER and did a stitch using Affinity Photo.

    With this, I did a pincushion correction. ie, I push the center bulge back. I did not correct the slant and by the time I cropped the wave off and the slant, there wasn't much left.



    Same photo same stitching but this time, I corrected the waves individually. then I rotated the image clockwise just a few degrees, then using the wrap function, I stretch the photo slightly at the 2 ends..

    Leave a comment:


  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by alfbranch View Post
    There is a lot of tosh talked about panoramas with the right stitching program handheld stitches are easy
    I tend not like such wide panoramas myself. Here are some...
    Nice panoramas Alf.

    Perhaps I was being a bit ambitious with a 6 shot pano and 25% overlap but I rarely do panoramas and have yet to learn its limitations.

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  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by DerekW View Post
    I like to create the web based panos ...I use the crudest of techniques - lots of images merged in Photoshop or Lightroom and then processed in Pano2VR.
    Derek, thank you for the idea.

    Originally posted by wanderer View Post
    I do a lot of panoramas and have done for many years.... I have a set of tick-offs.
    I usually use a tripod and get it set up as level as possible.
    Try not to use wide angle focal lengths, 17mm in MFT at most , preferably the long side of 25mm.
    Always use portrait format (gives you more foreground to work with). Aperture priority, focus point somewhere about 10-20m into picture (post processing will crop out the really close stuff).
    WB usually takes care of itself.
    30% minimum overlap.
    Swing through the whole view to check what you want or not, this also tells you where you are going if hand holding (and if handholding 'unwind' yourself).
    I haven't bothered with nodal points for years and have never had a problem.
    Try for a finished image no more than 8 to 1 otherwise its too long.
    In post processing if the option of cylindrical or spherical format is offered I usually take cylindrical as this reduces distortion.
    ....
    Duncan, thanks for the tips. When I took these shots I hadn't given much thought as to how to maximise their effectiveness and just assumed the Olypus software would do exactly what I wanted.

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  • MJ224
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • alfbranch
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    There is a lot of tosh talked about panoramas with the right stitching program handheld stitches are easy
    I tend not like such wide panoramas myself

    Here are some

    Banff and the bow river by Alf Branch, on Flickr

    This is through the window of a moving helicopter

    The Rockies 1- by Alf Branch, on Flickr

    Maligne lake panorama by Alf Branch, on Flickr

    Leave a comment:


  • wanderer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    I do a lot of panoramas and have done for many years (1981 with an OM-1!).
    I have a set of tick-offs.
    I usually use a tripod and get it set up as level as possible.
    Try not to use wide angle focal lengths, 17mm in MFT at most , preferably the long side of 25mm.
    Always use portrait format (gives you more foreground to work with). Aperture priority, focus point somewhere about 10-20m into picture (post processing will crop out the really close stuff).
    WB usually takes care of itself.
    30% minimum overlap.
    Swing through the whole view to check what you want or not, this also tells you where you are going if hand holding (and if handholding 'unwind' yourself).
    I haven't bothered with nodal points for years and have never had a problem.
    Try for a finished image no more than 8 to 1 otherwise its too long.
    In post processing if the option of cylindrical or spherical format is offered I usually take cylindrical as this reduces distortion.
    If you want a real challenge try a vertical panorama. I have probably done less than 10.
    If I find out how to upload images I'll stick a couple on.

    Leave a comment:


  • DerekW
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    I like to create the web based panos such as
    http://www.w9259.co.uk/Arches%20NP%2...arches1_1.html

    select the web link and then use the icons to navigate around and zoom in the image.

    I use the crudest of techniques - lots of images merged in Photoshop or Lightroom and then processed in Pano2VR.

    Leave a comment:


  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    So my simple pano was just 6 shots. These 6 in fact. The overlap was only about 25% so I had nothing to discard and had to use the middle 50% of each shot. Images 2 and 3 clearly show how turning the camera has affected the percieved angle of the roads and the last 2 show the same effect with the wall even though the overlap was a bit more generous.











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  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by Walti View Post
    ...So my latest Scottish scenery panorama was 40 frames merged together...
    Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
    Originally posted by IainMacD View Post
    ...This was 5 (possibly 6) shots at 18mm (the limit of the lens I was using) the height is quite restricted by the curving of each image for the stitch before cropping but it just about works.
    Walti, Mark, Iain
    Thank you for contributing your efforts to show me what I am aiming for.

    Leave a comment:


  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by Ian View Post
    Was this hand held or on a tripod? I prefer the second last but of course it needs cropping to straighten the framing, which is what you did in the last one.
    Thank you Ian.

    I did almost everything wrong you possibly could. It was handheld, I did not turn on the nodal point, I did not set a fixed white balance, and I was using ESP metering. The aperture was fixed (at F/8) and I was using aperture priority.

    I kept the first two images uncropped to show what Olympus and ICE produce "out of the box" as it were. I croppped the last one as that was the one I manually stitched together and photoshop crops images that you stretch out of the frame anyway. I just cropped a few pixels of ragged edge.

    Originally posted by IainMacD View Post
    My experience is that more photos at a longer focal length and in portrait format is the way to go, stitching wide angle images can cause real problems....
    Ah, yes. I forgot to do it all in portarit as well.

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  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by blu-by-u View Post
    Nice pano. You want less black spots, overlap more. Pincushion correction can be done in PhotoShop or Affinity....
    Thank you Henry. Yes more overlap is the answer.

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  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Panorama Trials and Tribulations (warning very wide images)

    Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
    I think the nature of panoramas will usually lead to the minor problems you have encountered. You have done well to iron them out.... You must remember the old school photos, where the camera actually turned by clockwork (?) to take those large school panoramas. That might have been a better technology than today, partly because of a tripod...
    Thank you Mark. Yes, I was referring to the old school photos.

    Originally posted by wornish View Post
    I prefer the last one.
    Thank you Dave. Me too.

    Leave a comment:

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