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How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

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  • #16
    Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

    Originally posted by Phill D View Post
    Looks like I'm going to have to Google a few tutorials on merging images then. Thanks everyone.
    I keep meaning to look at blending images in PS rather than using HDR function in LR but I'm yet to get around to it (I'm not a huge fan of the HDR in LR). There's plenty of tutorials on youtube though
    Nikon Z7, 70-200mm f2.8 VRII, 18-35mm f3.5-4.5G, 24-70mm f4, 85m f1.8, 50mm f1.8, Nikon SB-700.

    Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, 12-40mm f2.8, Panasonic Leica 100-400mm, 40-150mm f2.8, 40-150mm f4-5.6 R, 45mm f1.8

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    www.tobygunneephotography.com

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    • #17
      Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

      Originally posted by snerkler View Post
      I keep meaning to look at blending images in PS rather than using HDR function in LR but I'm yet to get around to it (I'm not a huge fan of the HDR in LR). There's plenty of tutorials on youtube though
      Thanks, I think I'll suggest it to Olympus as a firmware update if it's possible
      Nikon Z7, 70-200mm f2.8 VRII, 18-35mm f3.5-4.5G, 24-70mm f4, 85m f1.8, 50mm f1.8, Nikon SB-700.

      Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, 12-40mm f2.8, Panasonic Leica 100-400mm, 40-150mm f2.8, 40-150mm f4-5.6 R, 45mm f1.8

      My Flickr
      https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

      www.tobygunneephotography.com

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      • #18
        Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

        Originally posted by snerkler View Post
        I've been looking for a good reversed grad for a while but they all seem to be really expensive, do you have any recommendations?
        Don't you just rotate or flip it. You did with the ones I used to do. I don't use them any more

        Regards
        Andy
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        • #19
          Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

          Originally posted by shenstone View Post
          Don't you just rotate or flip it. You did with the ones I used to do. I don't use them any more

          Regards
          Andy
          No you can't do that as you'd have the edge of the filter running across your image
          Nikon Z7, 70-200mm f2.8 VRII, 18-35mm f3.5-4.5G, 24-70mm f4, 85m f1.8, 50mm f1.8, Nikon SB-700.

          Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, 12-40mm f2.8, Panasonic Leica 100-400mm, 40-150mm f2.8, 40-150mm f4-5.6 R, 45mm f1.8

          My Flickr
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

          www.tobygunneephotography.com

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          • #20
            Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

            Originally posted by snerkler View Post
            I've been looking for a good reversed grad for a while but they all seem to be really expensive, do you have any recommendations?
            Yes, unfortunately reverse grads are on the expensive side. However, as sunset / sunrise is the main use a strong ND3 is the only one I carry. I don't bother with ND1 and ND2 versions so that saves some expense.

            I have a Singh Ray Daryl Benson nd3 reverse grad for my full-frame camera and a Lee Sev5n version for my Olympus camera. I have the Singh Ray simply because they invented them and where the only source at the time.

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            • #21
              Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

              I've wondered about a reverse grad too. Stephen Elliott uses one a lot in Derbyshire, seems to work well for him.
              http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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              • #22
                Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

                Originally posted by snerkler View Post
                I've been looking for a good reversed grad for a while but they all seem to be really expensive, do you have any recommendations?
                I have the Formatt-Hitech resin reverse grad that works well. If I had more use for it I would probably invest in the Firecrest version.
                Iain

                E-M1, E-M1 II, E-M5 II, 7.5, 8-18, 12-40, 25, 40-150, 45, 60, 300

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                • #23
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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                  • #24
                    Re: How best to expose a sunset without a graduated filter?

                    Originally posted by IainMacD View Post
                    I have the Formatt-Hitech resin reverse grad that works well. If I had more use for it I would probably invest in the Firecrest version.
                    Nikon Z7, 70-200mm f2.8 VRII, 18-35mm f3.5-4.5G, 24-70mm f4, 85m f1.8, 50mm f1.8, Nikon SB-700.

                    Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II, 12-40mm f2.8, Panasonic Leica 100-400mm, 40-150mm f2.8, 40-150mm f4-5.6 R, 45mm f1.8

                    My Flickr
                    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

                    www.tobygunneephotography.com

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