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  • Originally posted by MikeOxon View Post

    ----------------
    If there were tiny discrepancies (perhaps rounding errors in the data) then the edges of some 'blocks' could remain visible. Remember that the eye is very sensitive to tiny changes in brightness along a line and tends to build up an impression of a stronger contrast than is actually there. Look at a grey-scale step-wedge to see this effect in practice.


    You correct and stretching the image makes things even worse.

    Deep Sky Stacker does actually work in blocks of pixels ( not sure if you can adjust the block size but might be worth a try. Trying another stacking app will at least eliminate it as a possible cause.
    Dave

    My Flickr

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    • Thanks for the suggestions guys, I have tried Iris but cannot see anything on a single image but not sure if I understood the software. Stacked in Sequator gave the same results as DSS i.e shows the banding. I am rapidly coming to the conclusion that something physical has happened to my EM1 MKII. I have gone back through my images and checked all my camera settings and all was well before the 3 Nov 2019. The camera settings are the same and my processing is the same. I do recall that one night recently I was imaging it clouded over and started to rain. I got some damp on the primary mirror of the RC6 which needed cleaning and can only assume now that something has gotten into the camera sensor mechanism. I might just give another go taking images with the IS on to see if that shows anything. The EM1 MKII seems to take normal pictures without any obvious defects. Time to contact Olympus support I guess.
      John

      OM-D E-M1, 12-40 f2.8 Pro, Tamron 14-150mm f5.8, E5, E3, Zuiko 50-200mm SWD, Zuiko 12-60mm SWD, Zuiko ED 70-300mm f5.6, 50mmf2, Zuiko ED 9-18mm f5.6, Sigma 50-500mm f6.3, EC14, EC20, RM-1, VA-1

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      • i have finally got around to having another go at the Andromeda galaxy. It's surprising how few clear skies there have been since my last attempt (post #352 in this thread)

        This time, I managed not to jog the tripod and I also used Deep Sky Stacker to combine four separate images, each with a 40 second exposure. The 'Star Adventurer' mount did a good job in tracking the stars and I found that polar alignment seems to get easier after a few attempts.

        My main problem now is the local light pollution and I had to cut out the darker levels in the image to get a reasonable-looking result, without an all pervading pink background. When I have gained more confidence, i shall have to take my gear to a place with darker skies.

        Click image for larger version

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        Mike

        Mike
        visit my Natural History Photos website:
        http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

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        • Congratulations on your image. I know how I felt when I got my first deep sky image - having spent an age getting everything to work as it should. It's very satisfying.


          so ........... the next step is.........


          drum roll ...........

          ............

          Take more pictures (or subs as the astrophoto people call them )

          Seriously, well-done, practice makes perfect, and more captures can be added in the future and stacked to add even more detail.

          The last three months have been more cloudy than I have ever experienced but its worth it when it all comes together.
          Dave

          My Flickr

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          • Thank you very much for your comments, Wornish. I still feel the need to come indoors and see what I've got before spending too long in the cold. As I gain confidence, I shall try larger stacks and more subjects but Andromeda is a good starting point. I'm pleased with the tracking but light pollution is a huge problem locally.
            Mike
            visit my Natural History Photos website:
            http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

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            • Useful reference chart for Moon Phases in 2020

              Click image for larger version

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              Dave

              My Flickr

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              • Click image for larger version  Name:	Decade-Moon2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	196.9 KB ID:	771974

                First Moon shot of the decade.

                OM1mk2 300mm +1.4TC. ISO250, F5.6, 1/250 sec. Single Shot - Tripod.
                Last edited by wornish; 2 weeks ago.
                Dave

                My Flickr

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                • MJ224
                  MJ224 commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Super photo...………..:-)

                • OM USer
                  OM USer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Excellent detail.

              • Originally posted by MikeOxon View Post
                i have finally got around to having another go at the Andromeda galaxy. It's surprising how few clear skies there have been since my last attempt (post #352 in this thread)

                This time, I managed not to jog the tripod and I also used Deep Sky Stacker to combine four separate images, each with a 40 second exposure. The 'Star Adventurer' mount did a good job in tracking the stars and I found that polar alignment seems to get easier after a few attempts.

                My main problem now is the local light pollution and I had to cut out the darker levels in the image to get a reasonable-looking result, without an all pervading pink background. When I have gained more confidence, i shall have to take my gear to a place with darker skies.

                Click image for larger version

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                Mike
                Wow! I want to try this! Remarkable and inspirational to say the least! No chance with the light pollution here I'd guess though...

                Ian
                Founder and editor of:
                Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
                Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
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              • wornish You can get light pollution filters that do make a big difference.
                Here is a good overview and comparison.

                https://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora...ey-really-work
                I've learned something today!

                Thanks Dave
                Founder and editor of:
                Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
                Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
                Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
                Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

                Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
                Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
                Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
                NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
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                • Probably the worst astro shot of Orion's sword ever but I was quite chuffed with it if indeed that's what I actually got. If it's just sensor noise then feel free to let me know but gently!
                  I was just playing about to see what I could get as the moon looked quite clear last night.
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                  Here is the moon shot I got at the same time.
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                  Both images shot hand held with the 40-150 at 150 plus the MC20 x2
                  I really must stop being lazy and dig out my tripod!
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

                  Comment


                  • Ian
                    Ian commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Very impressive, Phill - especially the Orion one - let's hope we get to witness the suspected Betelgeuse nova!

                • Your Orion shot is way better than my attempt the other night well done.
                  Considering its handheld it is superb. What settings for ISO and exposure time did you use?

                  You have got the sword and the purple bit is the Orion Nebula.
                  If you get your tripod out and take a few shots then stack you will be amazed at whats there.
                  Dave

                  My Flickr

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                  • Phill D
                    Phill D commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Thanks Dave I wasn't sure if I was in the right place and it was the Nebula or just noise. I think I used f5.6 at 3200iso with a range of shutter speeds. I tried 1, 2, and 4s as I'd got good daytime shots at those long times but the stars were just a mess. In the end the one I posted was 1/4s. Thinking about it without using a tracker much over 1s would be too long even on a tripod.

                • If you are taking moonshots here is a useful video that takes you through the steps to get the best out of them.
                  There are many other ways of doing the processing but this method is one of the most popular used.

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYLz7mxGHTg
                  Dave

                  My Flickr

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                  • Phill D
                    Phill D commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Just watched the video Dave thats a great tutorial thanks for the link.

                • Spooky Moon in the clouds tonight.


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                  Dave

                  My Flickr

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                  • Nicely done Dave. I find it quite difficult to get the moon and clouds in one shot. Tried it the other night and did keep a little bit of the cloud detail only to lose it all when I processed it for the moon.
                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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                    • MikeOxon
                      MikeOxon commented
                      Editing a comment
                      You could select the sky and process it differently from how you process the moon.

                    • Phill D
                      Phill D commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Yes true Mike, might have a go at that when the weather shows a bit more promise.

                  • I glanced up at Orion this evening and it looked to me that Betelgeuse was much fainter than usual. Photographs tend to even out the brightness of stars but I took a hand-held shot with my 45mm f/1.8 lens. This focal length is almost ideal for Orion, as Betelgeuse and Rigel fit neatly across the diagonal of the frame, with Betelgeuse towards the top-left.


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                    The 45mm f/1.8 has excellent resolution, as shown by the following cropped image of the Pleiades cluster (M45), where the smaller companion of the double-star Alcyone, near the centre of the cluster is separated cleanly:


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                    Mike
                    Mike
                    visit my Natural History Photos website:
                    http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

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