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  • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

    Very interesting last two sets Harold.
    Stuff from Cuba
    More stuff from Cuba
    It all started here

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    • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

      Originally posted by Beagletorque View Post
      Very interesting last two sets Harold.
      Thanks. Yes, it was out of interest that I started to photograph each of them. Often you can see more in a macro photograph than you can by direct viewing, even with a lens. The long term plan was to identify the subject. This did not take nearly so long with the club fungus.

      There is a third such project in progress now. I have what looks like a crystalline mineral sample on an old table in the garden. The mounds of protruding "crystals" are teeth of a crust fungus, of which I can find no good match with images in books or on the web. It has been permanently wet since we found it and I need some dry shots when the werther permits.

      Harold
      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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      • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

        Harold,
        outstanding documentary work, I commend you.
        Thanks for posting them up.
        Andrew
        Stuff from Cuba
        More stuff from Cuba
        It all started here

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        • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

          Originally posted by Beagletorque View Post
          Harold,
          outstanding documentary work, I commend you.
          Thanks for posting them up.
          Andrew
          Thanks, Andrew.

          It helps a lot to find subjects in my own garden and to have an outdoor table for more comfortable work and a greenhouse bench for more demanding work. (A shelf above the bench permits some lighting from above). (The project I am now completing had more shooting limitations).

          The main risk to the project was fungus-eating slugs (I did put out some pellets) or even deer.

          Harold
          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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          • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

            I've been trying to identify some of the fungi I've shot this year and I've got a little bit stuck.

            I'm can't seem to find anything in my book for these:


            Are these velvet shank?:




            And these glistening ink cap?:


            Amanda
            https://amandat.smugmug.com

            https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajthrelfall/

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            • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

              Originally posted by Mrs T View Post
              I've been trying to identify some of the fungi I've shot this year and I've got a little bit stuck.
              Amanda
              Amanda,

              I think the first one is the, very variable, Turkeytail, Trametes versicolor but I am not very good on brackets.

              The yellow one is a Pholiota, probably P. aurevilla, the Golden Scalycap.

              The last one has pale gills and it looks more like a Mycena, which are difficult.

              Harold
              The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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              • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                Thank you Harold.
                https://amandat.smugmug.com

                https://www.flickr.com/photos/ajthrelfall/

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                • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                  Interesting, I'd not heard the name Turkey Tail for Trametes versicolor before. I've always captioned it Many-zoned Polypore.
                  It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

                  David M's Photoblog

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                  • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                    Originally posted by David M View Post
                    Interesting, I'd not heard the name Turkey Tail for Trametes versicolor before. I've always captioned it Many-zoned Polypore.
                    This came in with the standardised English names issued by English Nature and the British Mycological Society a decade ago:

                    http://www.britmycolsoc.org.uk/library/english-names/

                    Harold
                    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                    Comment


                    • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                      Table Fungus 1

                      An old, plastic-laminated table has been out in our garden for many years. A week ago my wife drew my attention to a very unusual-looking fungus on the back, top edge of the table top. That yielded many images and will be featured later this week.

                      When I got in close, I could see that a rather different, and even more photogenic, species was growing as colonies along the bottom, rear edge. So far, I have been unable to identify the species, in spite of its very distinctive brown spines. Like the other two species it is a resupinate (crust) fungus, with the structures inverted, the parts which would normally be the cap in contact with the substrate.

                      The first part shown was about 10mm across. At this magnification I used my Schneider HM 40 at f16 and x1.5 TC combo (FOV 6mm wide). For the lower magnifications I used the Olympus 4/3 digital 50mm f2, sometimes with the matching x2 TC, effective or actual aperture f11 or f9. All were lit with triple TTL flash with the EM-1 in manual mode, hand-held.

                      Note the filament extending from a spine in the fifth and tenth image.

                      The stereos are crosseye.

                      Harold



















                      The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                      Comment


                      • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                        Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                        This came in with the standardised English names issued by English Nature and the British Mycological Society a decade ago:

                        http://www.britmycolsoc.org.uk/library/english-names/

                        Harold
                        Thanks Harold, I didn't know they had done that.
                        It's the image that's important, not the tools used to make it.

                        David M's Photoblog

                        Comment


                        • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                          A Warty Crust Fungus on an Old Table

                          This is on the vertical back edge of the same table as the species in the previous topic.

                          This group is called verrucose, meaning warty. This may be Radulomyces confluens.

                          There are some other fungi growing on it, just visible as long, straight, transparent stalks with spherical tips.(They look a bit ghostly in the stereo).

                          EM-1, Olympus 4/3 Digital 50mm f2 at f9, triple TTL flash, hand-held.

                          The stereo is crosseye.

                          Harold







                          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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                          • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                            Mineral-Like Crust Fungus on Old Garden Table

                            This is the last of three species found on the edge of the same table. This is the one which first drew our attention, looking more like mineral crystals than a fungus. Rather than being a flat colony, it has several raised groups of teeth (as these are called). This could be due to it growing over something protruding upwards but there is no evidence of this. I have been unable to find similar images with extensive searches. The tallest part is about 5-6mm high.

                            These were shot with the EM-1 in manual mode and triple TTL, off-camera flash. The lower magnifications were with the Olympus 4/3 50mm f2, some with a matched x2 TC behind it. The higher magnifications were with my reversed Schneider HM 40 and Kiron x 1.5 TC combo. The image features a brown, fleur de lys shaped object. I thought it was of botanical origin and it is not the only one attached to the colonies.

                            The sixth to eighth images show some tiny fungus growths on top of a more spiny tooth. Sometimes they have spherical droplets on them, making a more interesting image, sometimes not.

                            The final images are a claw-like structure which is part of the colony.


                            The stereos are crosseye.

                            Harold



















                            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                            Comment


                            • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                              Sweat or Tears?

                              I had been photographing some slime mould when I spotted this twig with a number of flat, grey crusts on it. Rather than regret missing the opportunity, I decided to shoot some macros. When I reviewed the images in the camera I saw that some drops of clear liquid were making, otherwise ordinary, images quite attractive.

                              Such droplets, essentially water, are exuded by some fungi.

                              So I fitted my Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 with a matched x1.4 TC to give the framing I wanted. his was on the EM-1 and lit by triple TTL flash and hand-held. The effective aperture was f11.

                              I include a crosseye stereo, which is not nearly as dramatic as most stereos but shows that the crust is some way off totally two-dimensional.

                              Harold







                              The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                              Comment


                              • Re: Communal flowers, trees, plants and fungi thread

                                Brandysnap? No, a Crust

                                It can seem that the temperate winter offers little material for macro. However, there are a lot of crust fungi around on dead branches, twigs and stumps of trees. This was growing on a large twig, dead for two or three years. The fruiting body forms a convex cushion. When examined closely, it is seen to be far from evenly curved.

                                The field of view is 5mm wide and, at f16*, not all is sharp. The texture and colour reminds me of brandy snaps, a treat made from caramelised sugar and, if that was not unhealthy enough, formed into a hollow tube and served stuffed with whipped cream.

                                *Effective, f8 on the lens

                                EM-1, x2TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2, Raynox MSN-202 supplementary, triple RC TTL off-camera flash. Hand-held.

                                Harold

                                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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