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  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



    Painted Lady


    In good nick

    by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

      Do Dragonflies eat bird poo?


      Common Darter by David Bell, on Flickr

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      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

        Originally posted by DavidB View Post
        Do Dragonflies eat bird poo?
        No, only insects. They will land and rest on any solid surface.

        Harold
        The body is willing but the mind is weak.

        Comment


        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

          Originally posted by DavidB View Post
          Do Dragonflies eat bird poo?
          I'd be interested to know if you saw any apparent 'feeding' or just a quick rest on a surface. Observation of that would be helpful.

          Although they are ravenous carnivores needing to eat huge amounts of 'meat' to keep them flying I have spent a happy half hour looking at some scientific papers about minerals and dragonflies.

          My starting point was that it is known that immature male butterflies need to 'lick' at the ground in order that they can ingest minerals which are important in their sexual development. And that mating is only possible after this. So I wanted to see if a similar situation occurs in dragonflies.

          Instead I have found a couple of papers of interest. The first was very deep biology (ie beyond me) looking at the vital role of calcium in the flight muscles. I am no wiser about the source of the calcium but thought it interesting.

          The other looked at the high numbers of dragonflies at gravel pits and quarries. Where there is mineral rich water. The numbers at gravel pits is a phenomenon I can immediately relate to. But that may just be a good place to breed and safe for the nymphs...If you find anything else I'd be interested.
          Peter (Art Frames)

          You can see some of my things on Flickr

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          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



            Teasal Bee


            Common Carder Bee (yes/no??)

            by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

              Originally posted by art frames View Post
              I'd be interested to know if you saw any apparent 'feeding' or just a quick rest on a surface. Observation of that would be helpful.

              Although they are ravenous carnivores needing to eat huge amounts of 'meat' to keep them flying I have spent a happy half hour looking at some scientific papers about minerals and dragonflies.

              My starting point was that it is known that immature male butterflies need to 'lick' at the ground in order that they can ingest minerals which are important in their sexual development. And that mating is only possible after this. So I wanted to see if a similar situation occurs in dragonflies.

              Instead I have found a couple of papers of interest. The first was very deep biology (ie beyond me) looking at the vital role of calcium in the flight muscles. I am no wiser about the source of the calcium but thought it interesting.

              The other looked at the high numbers of dragonflies at gravel pits and quarries. Where there is mineral rich water. The numbers at gravel pits is a phenomenon I can immediately relate to. But that may just be a good place to breed and safe for the nymphs...If you find anything else I'd be interested.

              The Dragonfly flew off a couple of times, and returned (as they do) to exactly the same spot with its mouth parts touching the bird poo each time, and its mouth parts were visibly moving. I've just checked my images and I photographed it in 3 different positions, all with its mouth touching the poo. They were 29 mins apart, not I spent that long watching it as I walked to a nearby hide, saw a Common Sandpiper partially obscured be vegetation, then walked back past that post again.

              I wondered whether it was coincidence, or something similar to butterflies taking minerals from the surface of the ground (having seen a group of Green-veined Whites on the ground a couple weeks ago around the remains of a puddle).

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              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                Return of Toadflax Brocade 2

                Here are shots of a larva a week later.

                Olympus EM-1 (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f11, hand-held.

                Harold



                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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                • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                  Brilliant colours Harold, lovely photo......

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                  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



                    Spider through the Spyhole...


                    Unsure of ID. Photo'd in wet scrapes area at WWT, on a reed leaf...

                    Perhaps a jumping spider of sorts...

                    Taken with the TG-5

                    by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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                    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                      Enjoying the feast.



                      Dave

                      My Flickr

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                      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                        I shot this using the 40-150 with the teleconverter. It is a great time of year for dragonfly pairing.



                        I also shot some video (which is a challenge at that length and handheld). If you click on the lower image you see the video on Flickr.
                        There you can see the contents of the abdomen of the male (the red one on top) and the vigorous muscle clenching and fluids inside his transparent abdomen. well worth two minutes of viewing.



                        I hope to get some better shots, I prefer to not use autofocus but it was windy and I am pleased under the circumstances. But a monopod and manual focus would be worthwhile.
                        Peter (Art Frames)

                        You can see some of my things on Flickr

                        Comment


                        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                          Originally posted by art frames View Post
                          I shot this using the 40-150 with the teleconverter. It is a great time of year for dragonfly pairing.

                          I also shot some video (which is a challenge at that length and handheld). If you click on the lower image you see the video on Flickr.
                          There you can see the contents of the abdomen of the male (the red one on top) and the vigorous muscle clenching and fluids inside his transparent abdomen. well worth two minutes of viewing.
                          Common Darters.

                          Nice image and video.

                          Harold
                          The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                          Comment


                          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                            Originally posted by wornish View Post
                            Enjoying the feast.
                            Superb colours and detail Dave...Excellente

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                            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



                              Some sort of Crane Fly I think. Lives at a stone circle in the Brecon Beacons, altitude of 360 metres or so...

                              ID appreciated

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                              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                                Mating Hoverflies Sphaerophoria interrupta

                                I shot this set in may but before I could post them someone else uploaded similar images so I put them aside.

                                These two, still together, kept moving around to different sides of the stem, sometimes spiraling round it.
                                This species is one of the smaller but conspicuous species and is my first capture of it.

                                I have been told, by someone who photographs a lots of hoverflies, that it I an unusual mating position.

                                The stereo is crosseye.

                                Olympus EM-1 (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f11, hand-held.

                                Harold







                                The body is willing but the mind is weak.

                                Comment

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