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  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

    [IMG]Migrant hawker dragonfly spade oak 29/8/19 by Walter Warburton, on Flickr[/IMG]mk2 p/l 100/400lens {bored waiting for a kingfisher)

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    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

      [IMG]Migrant hawker dragonfly spade oak 29/8/19 by Walter Warburton, on Flickr[/IMG]mk2 p/l 100/400lens (not bored now)

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      • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

        Cicada Exoskeleton.



        It is what remains when the insect molts from the nymph stage into an adult. As the nymph approaches maturity, it will find somewhere safe to emerge. These abandoned skins (exoskeletons/exuviae) will remain, still clinging to their chosen place until they are blown, washed or knocked off.

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        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

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          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

            Sharing a Food Supply

            I was photographing the Toadflax Brocade moth larva when the Marmalade hoverfly approached in the plane of focus.

            Olympus EM-1, (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro,1/30 at f8, hand-held.

            Harold

            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



              European Harvestman ?


              any corrections welcome

              by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



                Another Small Tortoiseshell


                They are so abundant now. Is there a Large Tortoiseshell?

                by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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                • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                  Originally posted by MJ224 View Post
                  European Harvestman ?
                  any corrections welcome
                  Yes, Mark.Leiobunum rotundum female. Probably the most common species.

                  Harold
                  The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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                  • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                    Return of the Toadflax Brocade 1

                    On 27 June I found these. This is at least the fourth year that the larvae have been seen in our garden. They always appear on Purple Toadflax but each year in a different part of out our large garden. They are always very localised, and of even age, suggesting that a single female laid one batch of eggs on each occasion.

                    Olympus EM-1 (aperture priority), Olympus 4/3 x2 TC, Olympus 4/3 50mm f2 macro, f8, hand-held.

                    The stereos are crosseye.

                    Harold









                    The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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                    • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                      Originally posted by MJ224 View Post


                      Another Small Tortoiseshell


                      They are so abundant now. Is there a Large Tortoiseshell?

                      by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

                      It is a real pleasure to see the numbers of Small Tortoiseshells this year. They crashed a few years back and have been very low in numbers since. That will have been a combination of factors (including weather but also a parasite was thought to have been involved) but they have begun to come back and maybe this year will help boost the breeding stock.

                      Yes, there are other tortoiseshells in Europe. The Large Tortoiseshell is a rare migrant to the UK and some records point to it breeding and maybe hibernbating, experts are hoping it will begin to move north and eventually regain a UK foothold. They are a little larger, a different colour and have more spots. Their behaviour is much different you'd see the differences. This specimen was in Croatia, but I have seen them a few times in France.


                      Croatia - Large Tortoiseshell

                      This one is another European tortoiseshell - the Scarce or Yellow-legged Tortoiseshell. This was one I photographed in the UK near my home in 2014 and was the first record of one in the UK since the 1950s. I hope this shot from my post at UK Butterflies works here...



                      This yellow-legged is from Hungary in 2017.


                      Yellow-legged Tortoiseshell - Nymphalis xanthomelas

                      Hope that helps..
                      Peter (Art Frames)

                      You can see some of my things on Flickr

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                        • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                          Every so often experts fly to somewhere expensive and stay in an exotic hotel and rename things. In the butterfly world it is often the latin family names that change, they sometimes agree that a new species has been found, or put one species in a different group. But sometimes they change the English name too!

                          So in my lifetime I used to watch hedge browns but now need to call them gatekeepers (which I try not to as it is a twee and pointless name) and need to remember that the Duke of Burgundy is no longer a fritillary...which is a fair change as it isn't. But I still fail at that.

                          But if you go back to Victorian times there are some wonderful names, long forgotten, but much more interesting. I must start using them again.
                          Peter (Art Frames)

                          You can see some of my things on Flickr

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                          • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                            Originally posted by art frames View Post
                            It is a real pleasure to see the numbers of Small Tortoiseshells this year. They crashed a few years back and have been very low in numbers since. That will have been a combination of factors (including weather but also a parasite was thought to have been involved) but they have begun to come back and maybe this year will help boost the breeding stock.
                            Peter,

                            Peter,

                            I have not seen an abundance, here in the central south. This year, I have seen what I would have called normal numbers many years ago. Two or three years ago, they were really abundant for the one season.

                            Harold
                            The body is willing but the mind is weak.

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                            • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread

                              Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
                              Peter,

                              Peter,

                              I have not seen an abundance, here in the central south. This year, I have seen what I would have called normal numbers many years ago. Two or three years ago, they were really abundant for the one season.

                              Harold
                              Harold,

                              I would not dispute your personal experience. Many butterflies are in quite difficult situations (as are many insects and birds). They increasingly have less viable sites - as sites are built on, farmed aggressively or managed differently. Absolute numbers at any site is going to be affected by local conditions.

                              What data we have comes from the 'surveying' which is led by enthusiasts and is a convenience sample (where I live or want to watch). That partial data is aggregated and dramatic forecasts are made and published. So each year we get reports of 'plummeting numbers' or 'surging populations'

                              As always the truth is probably not as dramatic. But what seems to be true is that some butterflies are better in hot summers and others in cooler damper ones. 'Experts' say the Small Tortoiseshell numbers improve in cooler wetter summers and seem to fall in hot ones. They like young vigorous nettles for foodplant. Having raised them as a child most years getting young nettles in a hot year is a challenge!

                              So this year we may have seen more but in some locations other factors were more important. Maybe more parasitic wasps, maybe too wet - which leads to fungal issues for the larvae and chrysalis.

                              But there are nothing like as many as when I was a child...
                              Peter (Art Frames)

                              You can see some of my things on Flickr

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                              • Re: Communal Dragonfly, Butterfly and Insect photo thread



                                Aged Painted Lady


                                In need of a lick of paint

                                by Mark Johnson, on Flickr

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