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  • ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

    This is certainly one of the most difficult birds of prey to approach AND photograp in the wild - at least for me. I dont want to sit in a hide all day long and unless I located their nesting site for this year it would be useless anyways. And I need a wide field of view to see them in the first place. So, Camo on and very careful search the woods ...
    I'll start with the best shot of trying day #2 (= today), so that you all can have a guess first:

    [email protected], havy cropp
    I am not afraid of Tits

  • #2
    Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

    Well, that's a great example of camouflage (and chromatic aberration).

    Given that I haven't seen a sparrowhawk in the wild, I would guess one of those but it looks a little large?

    Nick
    Bodies: E3, E-P1
    Lenses: 8mm, 14-42mm, 12-60mm, 50-200mm

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    • #3
      Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

      Hi,

      It looks like a Goshawk.
      /Tord

      My Gallery on 500px

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      • #4
        Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

        The yellow iris would lead me to think Sparrowhawk but that is more a bird of open hedgerows so the other would be Goshawk - more of a woodland bird.

        David
        PBase Galleries:-http://www.pbase.com/davidmorisonimages

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        • #5
          Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

          I'm hopeless at ID'ing our own, let alone yours, Falk.

          Through a tangled web of branches at least you captured its eye.

          Pity that birds choose mostly to perch in such photographically difficult places.
          My Flickr

          * mark * Wangaratta, Victoria, Australia **
          The OM-D E-M1 Mark II * OM-D M5 MkII * XZ2 * XZ1 * E3
          On post-processing: The camera kneads the dough, PP bakes the bread - Greenhill

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          • #6
            Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

            Well done Tord and David, and Nick was not far off either - it is indeed a Goshawk. Mark, you are excused

            I went into the woods yesterday with Goshawks, Ravens and some other stuff in mind. After abount 1 1/2h I had an adult Goshowk flying over my head (assumed male), using some mid days thermic currents to get some altitude, when I heard a second bird giving some half hearted calls, only about 50m from my position. I could not spot her in the Pine trees though. On hour or so later, after I had walked on some and then circled that patch of Pines I sat down for 15min. - there she was again - calling behind me. Unfortunately I had already my face mask lifted and was in a sun lit spot, had to turn around, switch on the camera, extend the Bigma etc. etc. - and had to spot her - of course. The later part was easy, as she was in almost plain sight, 100m away though. I managed to get of four shots, before she went on for some thicker cover:

            It is a semiadult (assumed) female Goshawk (Accipiter gentilis). The one in the starter post is from today and certainly the same bird. I saw her chasing Doves through the (mainly) Beech forest and then perch in that Oak a good 100m away. Darn sticks and twigs along that way, but pretty neat to get an eye in focus, right!? BTW: the yellow iris will with some age turn to orange and - in very old Goshawks - a dark garnet red.

            As for the CA's, yes, I had to notice, that the Bigma does produce some nice color fringes indeed. At least when shoot against the sun and if not stopped down (these are F7.1).

            I hope I can add to this thread in the near future. But it is next to impossible to outwit the mighty Goshawks. They are not very vocal and to spot them before they do is really hard.
            I am not afraid of Tits

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            • #7
              Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

              Here is the full frame, so you can get an idea of the actual distance and looks:
              I am not afraid of Tits

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              • #8
                Re: ? most difficult to approach Raptor ?

                Update
                About here ======^^^ you can see her tail feathers, sticking out to the left.

                I will not have internet during my time off, so please don't get uppset when I don't answer to comments right away.

                Cheers,
                Falk
                I am not afraid of Tits

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