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The Kruger - again!

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  • The Kruger - again!

    http://e-group.uk.net/forum/showthre...ghlight=safarihttps://www.sanparks.org/parks/kruger/



    One waded across the shallows and came out a lovely two tone grey.



    A first for us was this African Open Bill which perched in a dead tree below the terrace long enough to have its portrait taken.



    Breakfast in the Wimpey at Pretoriuskop hardly counts as the pinnacle of culinary sophistication but the journey to get there was well worthwhile. Hyenas can often be seem by the roadside at this time of day. Mum with her three pups about two months old was a real show stealer.



    Our favourite picnic spot is Timbavati where this glossy starling was happy to pose.



    Nearby a red headed weaver was starting its nest



    Ribs are showing on this rhino



    These Steenbok would not normally have hung around to be photographed.





    Not all animals are perfect and this elephant has deformed tusks, especially the right one. The reasons are not known but thought to be either genetic or a mineral deficiency. On a previous visit we photographed an elephant whose tusks turned back at right angles but it seemed to manage nonetheless.







    Life was a bit easier in the hide overlooking Lake Panic where there were several willing to pose.



    This battle scarred little hippo was so close to the side of the walkway to the hide that I had to hold the camera over the top and use the tilt facility.



    Blacksmith Plovers are common by the water but we were exceptionally fortunate with this one, also at Lake Panic. She had a damaged leg which caused difficulty in moving about and also sitting down to brood her chicks. The chicks had to fend for themselves as Mum could not keep up with their foraging. You can just see two tiny pairs of legs underneath her.







    There have been reports of poachers poisoning carcasses because the vultures give away their whereabouts. On the plus side we were pleased to see a number of armed patrols, especially on the eastern side.



    One morning a detour down a short loop revealed nothing but an Impala but on the way back we stopped to look at this tree. It turned out to have several vervet monkeys in it and they appeared to be licking the flowers to get nectar.



    Their normal way of avoiding danger is to lie still on a branch.

    David

    EM1ii, EM10ii

  • #2
    Re: The Kruger - again!

    Excellent photos, description, and commentry again.
    Cameras: E-M5, E-PM2, OM40, OM4Ti
    Lenses (M.Zuiko Digital): 7-14mm/F2.8, 12-40mm/F2.8, 40-150mm/F2.8+TC1.4x, 12-50mm/F3.5-6.3, 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 EZ, M.ZD 40-150 F4-5.6 R, 75-300mm/F4.8-6.7 Mk1, 12mm/F2, 17mm/F1.8
    Lenses (OM Zuiko): 50mm/F1.2, 24mm/F2, 35mm/F2.8 shift
    Lenses (OM Fit): Vivitar Series II 28-105mm/F2.8-3.8, Sigma 21-35mm/F3.4-4.2, Sigma 35-70mm/F2.8-4, Sigma 75-200mm/F2.8-3.5, Vivitar Series II 100-500mm/F5.6-8.0, Centon 500mm/F8 Mirror
    Learn something new every day

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The Kruger - again!

      Just a fantastic post, as usual! Full of practical information and fine images.

      I can't remember if I said before, but we enjoyed the Rissington Inn a lot as well.

      BTW do you have any comments on using the PL 100-400 for this sort of application? I see you managed a BiF! Did your 100-400 start off a bit stiff in the controls, and has it eased up with use? I've come to the conclusion that one of these is likely to meet my needs better than the 300 f4 (mostly game drives and motorsports, with not much interest in birding), but it's really helpful to have the benefit of others' experience.
      Regards,
      Mark

      ------------------------------
      http://www.microcontrast.com
      Too much Oly gear.
      Panasonic GM5, 12-32, 12-35, 15, 35-100, Laowa 7.5.
      Assorted legacy lenses, plus a Fuji X70 & a Sony A7S.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Kruger - again!

        Many thanks for a fascinating post, David, so much more entertaining than just the big 5.
        The picture tells the story, great when you have a bad memory.DW.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The Kruger - again!

          Originally posted by drmarkf View Post
          Just a fantastic post, as usual! Full of practical information and fine images.

          I can't remember if I said before, but we enjoyed the Rissington Inn a lot as well.

          BTW do you have any comments on using the PL 100-400 for this sort of application? I see you managed a BiF! Did your 100-400 start off a bit stiff in the controls, and has it eased up with use? I've come to the conclusion that one of these is likely to meet my needs better than the 300 f4 (mostly game drives and motorsports, with not much interest in birding), but it's really helpful to have the benefit of others' experience.
          This was my first outing with the 100-400 apart from a quick trial in the garden - I'd only had it a couple of weeks. It was/is stiff in use and it's irritating that the zoom rotates the opposite way to the 40-150. On the other hand it is light and handy for what it does and I have no quibbles. It's streets ahead of the 75-300 and 100-300, albeit much more expensive. I left the 50-200+EC14 at home - the first time I've been on safari without it.

          I also have the 300/4 but it was away being repaired. I got it from HDEW who were very quick when I reported a focussing problem. It took their repairers, Johnson of Glasgow, three weeks to dismantle and reassemble it but a quick trial suggests it now works OK. I'd probably not have used it much except for bird shots with the MC14. The 100-400 wasn't available when I got the 300 but if it had been I'd probably not have bothered with the 300. Zooms are generally more use for safari work.

          The Pied Kingfisher was actually hovering and it remained in more or less the same place for long enough to run off half a dozen shots in single frame mode. There was about 30 knots of wind at the time and the BIF was actually easier than when the bird was on a swaying reed! The causeway near Balule is single track with a couple of passing places and one isn't supposed to stop but there was so little traffic that we managed to without causing a problem.

          As I said in the post - anyone who is dithering about going on safari should book now!

          Best wishes
          David
          David

          EM1ii, EM10ii

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The Kruger - again!

            Great, thanks for that.
            Regards,
            Mark

            ------------------------------
            http://www.microcontrast.com
            Too much Oly gear.
            Panasonic GM5, 12-32, 12-35, 15, 35-100, Laowa 7.5.
            Assorted legacy lenses, plus a Fuji X70 & a Sony A7S.

            Comment

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