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Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

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  • KeithL
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
    Fascinating. Tell us more.
    I was part of the team that produced the first EC regulations for automotive EMC that came into force in 1989 (89/336/EEC) and its successor (95/56/EC). I also spent 20 years working on functional safety analysis of automotive control systems, which led to automotive compliance with IEC 61508 initially via MISRA* methods, and latterly the development of MISRA into ISO 26262. MISRA came into being in 1992; it had started out as a proposal under the government's SafeIT programme of 1990 which came under DTI (and was rather disowned by DTp for a long time!) It took two years to get that proposal up and running, largely because of internal politics in DTI; most of the 30-odd projects proposed didn't stay the course, but we did, and MISRA was judged the most successful of all those projects by far. It still runs as an industry-funded group, and has developed MISRA-C and MISRA C++ safe subsets of computer languages, the latter being adopted for use on the Joint Strike Fighter. * MISRA = Motor Industry Software Reliability Association

    I also led a project in a client role for the Dept of Transport about the monitoring of heavy diesels for compliance with regulatory requirements (a major problem world-wide).

    Around 20 years back I got involved in air-bag development and crash testing for a time; interesting, but not to my taste.

    For the EC, I was project manager of an ESPRIT project, 22816 COMPASS, which developed a prototype tool, and the methodology, for safety analysis. Our EC project officer for that project was Andrea Servida, whom you will find a lot about on the internet; a man whom I have enormous respect for. I also had the lead role for my employer in an EC project called EPHEM.

    Enough for now? Give you a flavour?

    Leave a comment:


  • Naughty Nigel
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by KeithL View Post
    I had a serious involvement with the European Commission for around 12 years. I found them pragmatic and sensible. I'd far rather deal with them than Whitehall any day! (I had to do that too - both the Dept of Transport and Dept of Trade and Industry when it existed. Best barrier to trade and industry I've ever met...IMHO)

    The EU has done far more than people realise to make vehicles safer, and one result is that people now walk away from car accidents today that would have killed them in the cars of 15-20 years ago. Safety costs money, and no manufacturer wants to spend money on unglamorous things. It takes bodies like the EU to force the issue. I could go into great detail about many things regarding vehicles and the EU - and indeed, the UN, and North American regulations - since I spent 37 years of my working life in motor vehicle engineering departments, and I was involved in national and international standards and regulations, including EU ones.
    Fascinating. Tell us more.

    Leave a comment:


  • KeithL
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
    Motoring regulations (including speed limits) have as much to do with revenue generation as road safety so I would not include those.

    However, for me, the difficulties of travelling around Europe with equipment made it a real pain. I travel to Europe on an almost weekly basis for much of the year, and life is so much easier now than it was then.
    I had a serious involvement with the European Commission for around 12 years. I found them pragmatic and sensible. I'd far rather deal with them than Whitehall any day! (I had to do that too - both the Dept of Transport and Dept of Trade and Industry when it existed. Best barrier to trade and industry I've ever met...IMHO)

    The EU has done far more than people realise to make vehicles safer, and one result is that people now walk away from car accidents today that would have killed them in the cars of 15-20 years ago. Safety costs money, and no manufacturer wants to spend money on unglamorous things. It takes bodies like the EU to force the issue. I could go into great detail about many things regarding vehicles and the EU - and indeed, the UN, and North American regulations - since I spent 37 years of my working life in motor vehicle engineering departments, and I was involved in national and international standards and regulations, including EU ones.

    Leave a comment:


  • KeithL
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Magus View Post
    Non-genocidal only in the direct sense. His continuous attempts to drive inflammatory wedges between the Muslim and Hindu communities in India in the period leading up to independence in the crazy attempt to preserve British rule by making each side desire to keep the Raj going as an intermediary ultimately resulted in monumental loss of life. The Dardanelles/Gallipoli blunder(which wouldn't have happened without his insistence) wasn't too good either!
    Yes, couldn't agree more. He loved confrontation; it was always his first recourse. He raised the Black and Tans and gave them a free hand, so alienating the moderate Irish. Did you know that he demanded the use of nerve gas (Adamsite) in northern Russia against villages during the period around 1920, when we had an expeditionary force at Archangel? He wanted to use it against Indian tribesmen, too. Fortunately, it didn't work well in Russia, so he was persuaded not to.

    Have you read "Military Intelligence Blunders" by Colonel John Hughes-Wilson? The chapters about the fall of Singapore and the Dieppe Raid give a good flavour of what he was like.

    A friend of ours lived close to Chartwell as a child. She remembers him walking around his estate in the nude, didn't give a damn who saw him, women or children. NOT normal behaviour, especially for a man who was then around 80!

    Leave a comment:


  • Naughty Nigel
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
    Having travelled in Europe many times before and after we joined, I disagree. There are not even unified motoring regulations. Apart from a slightly easier currency situation, I am unaware of any personal benefits that I have enjoyed.

    Free trade is good, the rest is a pain.

    Harold
    Motoring regulations (including speed limits) have as much to do with revenue generation as road safety so I would not include those.

    However, for me, the difficulties of travelling around Europe with equipment made it a real pain. I travel to Europe on an almost weekly basis for much of the year, and life is so much easier now than it was then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Magus
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by KeithL View Post
    Churchill was virtually ignored by his parents to the point where he literally craved love and affection, and only got it from his nanny. All his life, if you analyse his actions, he craved for attention and praise; he was ruthless, said himself that he "loved a good war"; was often duplicitous; and frequently vengeful and reckless. Fortunately, unlike the other two WW2 warlords, he wasn't beaten by his parents (well, drunken father) so he didn't indulge in genocidal activities - but he was otherwise remarkably like them.
    Non-genocidal only in the direct sense. His continuous attempts to drive inflammatory wedges between the Muslim and Hindu communities in India in the period leading up to independence in the crazy attempt to preserve British rule by making each side desire to keep the Raj going as an intermediary ultimately resulted in monumental loss of life. The Dardanelles/Gallipoli blunder(which wouldn't have happened without his insistence) wasn't too good either!

    Leave a comment:


  • Harold Gough
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
    The Common Market has made life much easier for all of us, whether we be in business or just enjoy a foreign holiday, and I believe it would be economic suicide for us to leave.
    Having travelled in Europe many times before and after we joined, I disagree. There are not even unified motoring regulations. Apart from a slightly easier currency situation, I am unaware of any personal benefits that I have enjoyed.

    Free trade is good, the rest is a pain.

    Harold

    Leave a comment:


  • Naughty Nigel
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Harold Gough View Post
    It was Edward Heath, who had no wife, who got us into the "Common market".

    Harold
    He did indeed. But the "Common Market" that we voted to join back in 1974 (?) was a far cry from the European Community that we now find ourselves in.

    The Common Market has made life much easier for all of us, whether we be in business or just enjoy a foreign holiday, and I believe it would be economic suicide for us to leave.

    (I remember taking an exhibition caravan and equipment to a boat show in Dublin in the 1980's. The paperwork that we needed to complete to take a television set and video recorder in Ireland, and then back again was unbelievable. Even cameras had to be accompanied by receipts when traveling.)

    However, there are certain other aspects of the EU that we could well do without, including much of the red tape and needless legislation that has come our way. (Certain Hasselblad cameras come to mind.)

    Leave a comment:


  • OM USer
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Zuiko View Post
    I'm fully in agreement with this. I also think we need a national debate involving everyone, not just the politicians, about how we are going to fund pensions, care of the elderly and life end arrangements.

    Personally I don't want to live into my eighties or nineties, in a nursing home hanging on by my fingertips to a life which no longer has any real quality or meaning. I don't want to be a drain on the taxpayer or deplete my family's inheritence, just to add a few more meaningless years to my life whilst I continue to needlessly consume more of the Earth's precious resources that would be better conserved for future generations. I want to be able to stipulate in a living will the circumstances in which my life will be ended by euthenasia, rather than face the present prospect of perhaps having to end my life a little earlier than neccesary whilst I am still able, in order to keep control over my final outcome.

    I don't believe I would be alone, or even in the minority, in making that choice if it was available - especially if by doing so we could collectively afford better pensions for the years of retirement in which we are active, healthy and able to fully enjoy life. It's not how long you live that counts, it's how you live and the quality of life that matters.
    There have been a number of programmes on the radio recently about dementia, care of the elderly, and the quality of life. They all trot out the formula that we must talk about death, one even mentioned "carousel" (from Logan's Run), but never actually get around to talking about it. As a society we must teach our children (and ourselves) to accept that choosing death is not wrong and that they (the children) should be accepting of it when us (the parents) choose it for ourselves having lived the life we want and wishing to make way for the next generation at the point when we beconme a burden.

    Leave a comment:


  • Harold Gough
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    It was Edward Heath, who had no wife, who got us into the "Common market".

    Harold

    Leave a comment:


  • Naughty Nigel
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by KeithL View Post
    Parenting is absolutely vital to developing responsible and balanced adults. But so often, and increasingly in modern times, it seems to be sorely lacking. The consequences aren't good for our society; and they are there for all to see. Yet as a nation, we seem blind to what is happening. Teachers, police, courts are no substitute for good parenting, are they? you'd think we might leaqrn lessons from the past, but we surely don't.
    Interesting observations Keith.

    Many of the problems of parenting seem to have arisen as a result of our very liberal attitudes towards what a 'family' is, and how it should behave.

    The traditional idea of a man and woman marrying for life and then having children together seems to have been left behind in the 20th century. We may disagree about the merits of a traditional 'nuclear' family or whatever they call it nowadays, but we cannot dispute that despite our supposedly enlightened ideas the incidence of dysfunctional families has gone exponential.

    Even amongst so called 'nuclear' families the pressures of work and finance mean that family time is increasingly limited. Modern technology means that work is brought home on laptops or via VPN's, whilst managing all of the household equipment, software, supplies and utilities that we regard as 'essentials' nowadays (with associated payments) has become almost a full time job all on its own.

    The internet has made a lot of things easier and sometimes cheaper, but it has also made life complicated in other ways, and has increased the number of things that we have to do for ourselves, and the time that we spend doing them.

    As an example, at one time a man would come to read the gas and electricity meters every three months. We would then receive a bill through the post, which would simply be paid in cash or by dropping a cheque off at the Gas Board showrooms whilst doing the shopping. Now we have to read the meter ourselves every month, log on, enter the meter readings, then when prompted by email log on again to download the bill, check to see if another suppler or tariff is cheaper, so on and so forth.

    Similarly, buying a rail ticket was a simple matter of turning up at the station and paying at the booking office. We now have to wade through a plethora of fares on-line, then take the booking reference and card to a machine to print the tickets; but if we make a mistake and buy the wrong ticket it is our loss.

    Then there are the Income Tax Self Assessment forms to fill in, and the many other ticky box forms that we seem to have to complete and sign nowadays to cover somebody's backside. The number of forms we have to complete for each school trip is now becoming ridiculous. Surely the school knows our name, address and doctor's name by now!

    Aside from the financial side of things we gradually have to do more and more ourselves, which takes more and more effort and time that could and should be spent with our nearest and dearest.

    Rant over.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chevvyf1
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by KeithL View Post
    I read through this thread for the first time tonight. I must say, I'm astonished how it has morphed from "We hate Gordon Brown" to "Women Rule OK" in about three pages!!

    I'd like to add a little something that some of you will no doubt regard as highly controversial. Take World War 2. Churchill, Stalin, and Hitler all had very damaged childhoods, and those damaged childhoods led to what can be described as extremely unsocial behaviour. Churchill was virtually ignored by his parents to the point where he literally craved love and affection, and only got it from his nanny. All his life, if you analyse his actions, he craved for attention and praise; he was ruthless, said himself that he "loved a good war"; was often duplicitous; and frequently vengeful and reckless. Fortunately, unlike the other two WW2 warlords, he wasn't beaten by his parents (well, drunken father) so he didn't indulge in genocidal activities - but he was otherwise remarkably like them. The consequence of bad parenting is all too clear.

    Parenting is absolutely vital to developing responsible and balanced adults. But so often, and increasingly in modern times, it seems to be sorely lacking. The consequences aren't good for our society; and they are there for all to see. Yet as a nation, we seem blind to what is happening. Teachers, police, courts are no substitute for good parenting, are they? you'd think we might learn lessons from the past, but we surely don't.

    Your right in every way and the past, excellent NHS Psychology & Psychiatry was built on the learning of "Parenting a child" is very important and evils of separating young children from their mothers and evacuating the children - hence the birth of the Tavistock Clinic in London and the import of Attachment

    Will we ever learn ? No ... needs must ... from women in the munitions factories ; fields and farming (landgirls) and other industries needed to be manned by women as the men were away at WAR ... to Women having to work because of the cost of living/a family/a home (rented/housing association or mortgaged) its women back to work to keep the jobs for UK people (and women working towards paying their own Ni; Taxes (for the "Systems" to stay afloat and, to pay for their own Pensions)

    What goes around, comes around and goes around again

    Leave a comment:


  • KeithL
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    I read through this thread for the first time tonight. I must say, I'm astonished how it has morphed from "We hate Gordon Brown" to "Women Rule OK" in about three pages!!

    I'd like to add a little something that some of you will no doubt regard as highly controversial. Take World War 2. Churchill, Stalin, and Hitler all had very damaged childhoods, and those damaged childhoods led to what can be described as extremely unsocial behaviour. Churchill was virtually ignored by his parents to the point where he literally craved love and affection, and only got it from his nanny. All his life, if you analyse his actions, he craved for attention and praise; he was ruthless, said himself that he "loved a good war"; was often duplicitous; and frequently vengeful and reckless. Fortunately, unlike the other two WW2 warlords, he wasn't beaten by his parents (well, drunken father) so he didn't indulge in genocidal activities - but he was otherwise remarkably like them. The consequence of bad parenting is all too clear.

    Parenting is absolutely vital to developing responsible and balanced adults. But so often, and increasingly in modern times, it seems to be sorely lacking. The consequences aren't good for our society; and they are there for all to see. Yet as a nation, we seem blind to what is happening. Teachers, police, courts are no substitute for good parenting, are they? you'd think we might leaqrn lessons from the past, but we surely don't.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chevvyf1
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Naughty Nigel View Post
    I think this is true. I find that women in particular are highly sensitive to 'slightly odd' comments that we men would brush off, and are also sensitive to how people look at them; making comments such as "Did you see how she looked at me?" and so forth.
    It is mainly why same sex relationships work no gender considerations ... except on who plays "wife role"

    Leave a comment:


  • Naughty Nigel
    replied
    Re: Doomed, the whole World is doomed! (Political)

    Originally posted by Jim Ford View Post
    I wonder if girls hold a grudge for longer it's because their social sensibilities are more acute than boys and therefore a disagreement cuts and hurts deeper. Boys operate at a more 'brutish' level and therefore don't feel a disagreement so deeply. A girl/woman may feel slighted by an unconsidered remark, whereas a boy/man may not even notice it.

    Jim
    I think this is true. I find that women in particular are highly sensitive to 'slightly odd' comments that we men would brush off, and are also sensitive to how people look at them; making comments such as "Did you see how she looked at me?" and so forth.

    Leave a comment:

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