Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another wildlife photographer moved to Olympus gear - interview on DPR

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another wildlife photographer moved to Olympus gear - interview on DPR

    An interesting interview on DPR:
    https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/...the-om-d-e-m1x

    "I came from full-frame professional DSLRs, and those things are bricks. They wear your body out." - yes exactly!

    I am often seeing folks with Olympus Em1Mk2 / EM1X and 300mm F4 around nature reserves these days.
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/macg33zr/

  • #2
    Nice images: thanks for that.
    Regards,
    Mark

    ------------------------------
    http://www.microcontrast.com
    Too much Oly gear.
    Panasonic GM5, 12-32, 12-35, 15, 35-100, Laowa 7.5.
    Assorted legacy lenses, plus a Fuji X70 & a Sony A7S.

    Comment


    • #3
      Olympus is definite;y gaining mindshare in wildlife photography these days. I get a lot of interest in my Oly gear when I'm out and about.
      Best wishes

      Wildwood

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you for an interesting post. According to the EXIF the shot of the buffalo drinking was with an EM1ii not an EM1X.
        David

        EM1ii, EM10ii

        Comment


        • #5
          I rocked up to a Norfolk wildlife photography course in the UK run by Chris Gomershall some years ago (2014 I think) with my Em1Mk1 attached to a 90-250mm lens. The response from some with interest was "What have you got there?". I was the only one with a mirrorless camera, others mostly had Canons and Nikons!
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/macg33zr/

          Comment


          • #6
            Very impressive photography in that article. As I've said before, if money were no object, I'd have an X (I do find the cost realy quite eye watering). Having seen and held one, they're not actually that big. As for pricing, the age of mass consumerism is over, in real photography. If Olympus needs to be more like Leica, to survive, then so be it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking at the 'water' buffalo again it looks like an ordinary African/Cape buffalo to me. I don't think you get water buffalo in Africa, at least not in the wild.
              David

              EM1ii, EM10ii

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Melaka View Post
                Looking at the 'water' buffalo again it looks like an ordinary African/Cape buffalo to me. I don't think you get water buffalo in Africa, at least not in the wild.
                He has other pictures labelled as Cape Buffalo on his 500px site. I am not expert on this myself!
                https://500px.com/photo/60733878/A-L...user_id=679566
                https://www.flickr.com/photos/macg33zr/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Definitely a Cape buffalo in my view. The water buffalo is domesticated but you'd be hard put to domesticate a Cape buffalo. It's regarded as being unpredictable and highly dangerous.
                  David

                  EM1ii, EM10ii

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I received my copy of the Scottish Ornithological Society magazine this week. There is a 2 age article on photography by a member extolling the delights of lightweight cameras. He uses Sony but also praises the Olympus system.
                    I also think that those of us who are perhaps a little less young much prefer not to lug heavy stuff about the hills, I certainly do
                    Duncan

                    Lots of toys.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X