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  • The decline of cameras.

    An interesting article by Robin Wong:

    So, how can we address his fourth point?
    Photographer and occasional PetaPixel guest author Robin Wong recently published a very interesting take on a question that most people thought was
    Graham

    We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

  • #2
    Yes interesting … I must try and get out and use mine more, but I'll never get to be artistic. for me its a wat to record the wonderful places I go in the best possible way. that's my limit and I am comfortable with it

    Regards
    Andy
    My Kit (OK I'm a hoarder...)
    4/3 E500, E510, E30 + 35macro, 50macro, 7-14, 11-22, 14-45 (x2), 14-54, 40-150 (both types), 50-200, 70-300, 50-500,
    m 4/3 EM1MkII + 60 macro, 12-100 Pro
    FL20, FL36 x2 , FL50, cactus slaves etc.
    The Boss (Mrs Shenstone) E620, EM10-II, 14-41Ez, 40-150R, 9 cap and whatever she can nick from me when she wants it

    My places
    http://www.shenstone.me.uk http://landroverkaty.blogspot.com/
    https://vimeo.com/shenstone http://cardiffnaturalists.org.uk/

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't know about you, but my photography aims are not stagnant. I am a long way off achieving the perfect bird photo, and every walk I do with the camera I am hopeful to do better.

      Who knows the future, you just cannot say that technology has peeked, cameras may well use a totally different approach in the future, smaller, better quality (IQ) and less effort. Something like a pair of spectacles, which record what you see in 1;1 scale, ie infinitely zoomable....who knows.

      But of course the average punter is very happy with his phone camera, and have to say the phone is so small and handy...………

      I am enjoying the ride, but may have peaked with the EM1 ii, maybe...……….

      Comment


      • #4
        I think the main issues are that photographs are ubiquitous nowadays so it's very difficult to produce anything genuinely original, and if you do manage to capture that "once in a lifetime" moment people just assume it's Photoshopped. My interest in photography has definitely waned since the advent of high quality digital, and I can't be bothered to go back and do it on film any more. I still have a load of film in the freezer in case I ever get the urge but as time passes the chances of that happening seem lower and lower. My photography is just for record purposes these days, mostly.
        Regards
        Richard

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        • #5
          Cameras are NOT in decline - they are everywhere and a significant order more photographs are taken every day than ever before. But the bottom of the market (compact and other budget cameras) has been completely blown away by smartphones.

          Now we are seeing that effect spread up the ranks. People, including experienced photographers, are now finding that for a lot of routine photography they don't need some of the gear they once did. There was a news item the other day about a couple that had their wedding photographed by a professional using a smartphone...

          I use arguably the best camera smartphone currently available, the Huawei P30 Pro. It shoots RAW, it has an ultra wide prime, a wide angle standard and a portrait tele prime lens plus loads of clever modes and AI to help things along. It has, gasp, reduced my incentive to carry my E-M1 Mark II around with me - and that's a relatively compact camera compared to APS and FF offerings. It's also incredibly easy to get smartphone images onto social media - and now - forums like this.

          BUT Almost everything else about using a smartphone as a camera is a pain in the butt! While the phone is almost always there, it's very difficult to hold steady, to get creative angles, to switch to lenses beyond the scope of the built in ones, to obtain pure optical effects (like anomaly-free DOF blur), to use supports like tripods, filters, etc., etc.

          That's why I, personally, can't see myself dumping a system camera - well - ever, certainly not in any future I can yet see.

          So the question is - how many people are similarly like-minded? And perhaps more concerning - how many will never get to realise the benefits and the wonder of using a 'proper' camera?

          In a way, it's our job to fly the flag for the cause. Both my early-20s daughters use system cameras as well as their smartphones. I'm doing my bit

          Ian
          Founder and editor of:
          Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
          Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
          Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
          Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

          Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
          Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
          Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
          NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
          sigpic

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          • Ian
            Ian commented
            Editing a comment
            I know the Robin Wong article is focusing on perceived reasons away from smartphones, but fundamentally you can't escape from smartphones. The smartphone effect makes it much more difficult for conventional camera manufacturers from getting away with strategy errors and there have been many of those in the industry in the past!

        • #6
          I actually disagree that photography has become stagnant. There is a lot of amazingly striking, moving and beautiful new photography. And many of those making those images are relatively inexperienced, too. I was anti-Instagram when it first started but I was so wrong. While there is a *LOT* of dross on there, it's also a treasure trove of superb imagery, for example.

          Are we becoming punch-drunk with the sheer volume of great images produced by others? That could be the case. But don't let that put you off!

          Ian
          Founder and editor of:
          Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
          Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
          Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
          Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

          Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
          Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
          Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
          NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
          sigpic

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          • #7
            For me, it’s his fourth point that rings true. While I have experimented with photography most of my life, what I see presented at clubs, in competitions, is very much “sameness” and I really enjoy seeing “different” (often rewarding it with higher marks and encouraging comments)

            As for kit, I’m able to produce very high quality images with my 8MB Olympus Tough, and while the “new toys” are excellent, I actually get a lot of satisfaction producing images with what I have available.
            Graham

            We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

            Comment


            • #8
              Originally posted by Graham_of_Rainham View Post
              For me, it’s his fourth point that rings true. While I have experimented with photography most of my life, what I see presented at clubs, in competitions, is very much “sameness” and I really enjoy seeing “different” (often rewarding it with higher marks and encouraging comments)

              As for kit, I’m able to produce very high quality images with my 8MB Olympus Tough, and while the “new toys” are excellent, I actually get a lot of satisfaction producing images with what I have available.
              A photography club is a very small sample to be considering

              Ian
              Founder and editor of:
              Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
              Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
              Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
              Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

              Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
              Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
              Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
              NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
              sigpic

              Comment


              • #9
                Club photography exists to please club judges, that's all. I gave it up after a club judge wanted to know which Photoshop filter I'd used to produce a print which had been made in the darkroom using the lith process (if you don't know what that is, search Tim Rudman). Another suggested my carefully centred composition would have looked better based on the rule of thirds. Yeah, and David Bailey should have used colour!
                Regards
                Richard

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by Ian View Post

                  A photography club is a very small sample to be considering

                  Ian
                  Agreed, but I also spent a lot of time wading through images for the RPS, ephotozine and Photo Technique (when it was active).

                  When we see a picture that has that “WOW” factor, it’s refreshing. Often when I see Taylor Wessing pictures etc., I see a lot of “sameness” even though they are very high quality images. Maybe I have become desensitised
                  Graham

                  We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    Originally posted by Otto View Post
                    Club photography exists to please club judges, that's all. I gave it up after a club judge wanted to know which Photoshop filter I'd used to produce a print which had been made in the darkroom using the lith process (if you don't know what that is, search Tim Rudman). Another suggested my carefully centred composition would have looked better based on the rule of thirds. Yeah, and David Bailey should have used colour!
                    Ah lith; super-high contrast tone elimination. I spent many an hour in the darkroom playing around with high contrast papers and home-made developer brews

                    Ian
                    Founder and editor of:
                    Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
                    Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
                    Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
                    Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

                    Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
                    Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
                    Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
                    NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Graham_of_Rainham View Post

                      Agreed, but I also spent a lot of time wading through images for the RPS, ephotozine and Photo Technique (when it was active).

                      When we see a picture that has that “WOW” factor, it’s refreshing. Often when I see Taylor Wessing pictures etc., I see a lot of “sameness” even though they are very high quality images. Maybe I have become desensitised
                      As I said, there is now a very high volume of consistently brilliant photography and it's very accessible - the bar has definitely risen.

                      Ian
                      Founder and editor of:
                      Olympus UK E-System User Group (http://e-group.uk.net)
                      Four Thirds User (http://fourthirds-user.com)
                      Digital Photography Now (http://dpnow.com)
                      Olympus camera, lens, and accessory hire (http://e-group.uk.net/hire)

                      Twitter: www.twitter.com/ian_burley
                      Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/dpnow/
                      Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/ianburley/
                      NEW: My personal BLOG ianburley.com
                      sigpic

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Otto View Post
                        Club photography exists to please club judges, that's all. I gave it up after a club judge wanted to know which Photoshop filter I'd used to produce a print which had been made in the darkroom using the lith process (if you don't know what that is, search Tim Rudman). Another suggested my carefully centred composition would have looked better based on the rule of thirds. Yeah, and David Bailey should have used colour!

                        I have often heard that comment! There’s a fair degree of truth in what you and others say about club photography. I actually had a judge make derogatory comments about one of the people who had modelled for the picture, which was completely the wrong thing to do. I no longer enter competitions as I found myself taking pictures for competitions rather than for my own pleasure.

                        Sometimes, at the end of an evening, people will “enlighten” me about their pictures. My favourite feedback was from a members of a club in London, who said I was the only judge that had spotted that his entry was produced in a darkroom. I didn’t tell him that I could smell the chemicals
                        Graham

                        We often repeat the mistakes we most enjoy...

                        Comment


                        • Ian
                          Ian commented
                          Editing a comment
                          We definitely need a richer set of 'Likes'

                      • #14
                        Originally posted by Ian View Post

                        Ah lith; super-high contrast tone elimination. I spent many an hour in the darkroom playing around with high contrast papers and home-made developer brews

                        Ian
                        Ha! You fell into the trap . The lith printing process I was referring to uses very high contrast lith developer, yes, but at very high dilution. It's a misnomer really. If you look at Tim's site you'll see the sort of results that can be produced - often they are quite beautiful. It's usually more luck than judgement though .
                        Regards
                        Richard

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          Originally posted by Ian View Post
                          I use arguably the best camera smartphone currently available, the Huawei P30 Pro. It shoots RAW, it has an ultra wide prime, a wide angle standard and a portrait tele prime lens plus loads of clever modes and AI to help things along. It has, gasp, reduced my incentive to carry my E-M1 Mark II around with me - and that's a relatively compact camera compared to APS and FF offerings. It's also incredibly easy to get smartphone images onto social media - and now - forums like this.

                          Ian
                          I have the P30, which is very similar to the P30 Pro, and loving it. I really enjoy editing Oly Raws for a batch of images, but now find I'll sometimes use the P30 for just a few shots, as the AI generally gives better JPGs than my E-M1s if I don't want to edit Raws. Even with AI turned off, it will do HDR blends in the background when lighting demands it. The cameras have also improved a lot since release with updates, the colour balance being different across the cameras initially. I must try Raw on the P30 again now Lightroom Classic supports them. My initial impression was that the interpolated 10MP JPGs with some background AI gave better results than the 40MP Raws.

                          Bruce

                          http://flickr.com/photos/bruce-clarke/

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