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  • Tripods

    Hi All. I feel like I'm asking to many questions, thank you for everyone's help and advice so far.

    Previously my camera accessory experiences have been buying items from Argos but now I'm getting into and enjoying photography Im beginning to appreciate the benefit of spending a little more on half decent gear.

    I was looking at K&F Concept tripod, my budget is between 50 and 70.00.

    Can anyone guide me on best value for money at this level or any other makes that are as good or better. I've been looking at you tube reviews for weeks and theres a lot to consider, well, for me anyway.

    Thanks so much for all the help you folks are giving me on here.

    Lee

  • #2
    Re: Tripods

    IBIS is so good these days that you often don't need a tripod. Now you have the EM1ii it might be worth seeing if it works well for you without one.
    David

    EM1ii, EM10ii

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    • #3
      Re: Tripods

      The K&F range of tripods appears to be well designed, versatile and good value for money. I would recommend, if you have the opportunity, to examine one before you buy (as with any tripod) to check that all the movements are smooth and positive, offering just enough resistance to prevent it from feeling sloppy and difficult to position precisely before tightening but without it feeling too stiff and jerky. In particular check that the clamps on the legs grip tight with no creepage but are easy enough to undo, particularly with cold, numb hands. Fully extend the tripod, then grasp the head firmly and twist in all directions, to check how rigid it is. Ideally there should be very little movement. Also press down firmly on the head, to check that the thinnest leg sections don't bow.

      The ball head itself should rotate smoothly and fluidly in the socket, without suddenly flopping over with the risk of damaging your camera. When fully tightened there should be no movement or play and the same goes for the quick release plate, which should click firmly into place with ease and should have a fail safe mechanism to prevent it from suddenly detaching from the head when you release it.

      When buying a tripod you want sturdiest, most rigid model you can find, but at the lightest weight and the most compact when folded. Obviously these criteria are totally incompatible and a compromise has to be made by selecting one that provides sufficient support at a weight and size you are willing to carry.

      Generally, look for a tripod that extends to the maximum height you are likely to need without extending the central column, which is a recipe for unwanted vibrations. Check also that it adjusts down to the lowest height you are likely to need, for those worm's eye landscape shots or woodland flowers. Be aware that the less leg sections the better if you are willing to sacrifice a little portability. Remember, though, that the best and sturdiest tripod is useless if it is always at home because you cannot carry it!
      John

      "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

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      • #4
        Re: Tripods

        What John (Zuiko) said is the best advice.

        Its only of use if you will carry it … brand matters little

        regards
        Andy
        My Kit (OK I'm a hoarder...)
        4/3 E500, E510, E30 + 35macro, 50macro, 7-14, 11-22, 14-45 (x2), 14-54, 40-150 (both types), 50-200, 70-300, 50-500,
        m 4/3 EM1MkII + 60 macro, 12-100 Pro
        FL20, FL36 x2 , FL50, cactus slaves etc.
        The Boss (Mrs Shenstone) E620, EM10-II, 14-41Ez, 40-150R, 9 cap and whatever she can nick from me when she wants it

        My places
        http://www.shenstone.me.uk http://landroverkaty.blogspot.com/
        https://vimeo.com/shenstone http://cardiffnaturalists.org.uk/

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        • #5
          https://www.flickr.com/photos/amcuk/

          Comment


          • #6
            https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...od/sku-908102/
            https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/used-equip...od/sku-908106/

            For a m43 camera a 190 series Manfrotto might do - MPB have a couple of those too. I always feel that there's no harm in going for one that takes gear heavier than you use at the moment, though, because you never know when you might acquire something that needs it.

            Remember to turn image stabilisation off when you use a tripod!

            [I don't have any connection to MPB by the way but I've always found them excellent to deal with.]
            Roger

            E-M5, 20mm/1.7, 45mm/1.8
            OM-1N, OM-10, OM-4ti, 24mm/2.8, 50mm/1.8, 85mm/2, Tamron 70-210mm/3.5
            cariadus.com | flickr | tumblr

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            • #7
              Re: Tripods

              The K&F and all the similar/same (zomei etc) generic tripods are great value and will easily do the job for you. I had one (zomei 666) for a year or two (still have it as a spare) and happily did long exposures with it upto a couple of minutes. I used it with both the em10ii and em5ii coupled with a 12-40 pro, so not quite as heavy as your em1ii, but you should be fine.
              The down sides were that over time one of the legs worked loose and I had to tighten the Allen bolt a few times and the ball head lost a spring from the clamp, but it still worked.

              You hear a lot said about cheap tripods being rubbish and needing to spend fortunes for stable and light gear. I now own one of the oft recommended (expensive) brands along with a upgrade of ball head. The quality and workmanship is undoubtedly better, it's taller too, but is it many times better in line with cost? are my photos any better? No probably not, but it is very nice kit, looks nice and will probably last years and years.

              Hope that helps...
              Junk on Flickr
              Even more Junk on Instagram

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Tripods

                The oft repeated rule about choosing a tripod is:

                Light
                Cheap
                Rigid

                Choose any two out of the three.

                But - I would agree with others that question whether a tripod is really necessary with the Olynpus IBIS.

                Jim

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                • #9
                  Re: Tripods

                  One big advantage of a tripod is that it maintains your precise composition for as long as you need. This is very useful if you are seeking to capture fleeting light on a landscape. If working hand held, when the light finally comes you have to quickly recompose before taking the shot and by the time you have done this the light may have gone. If you are already set up on a tripod you only have to click the shutter when the decisive moment arrives. I'm a big fan of tripods for landscape work.
                  John

                  "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Tripods

                    Originally posted by Jim Ford View Post
                    The oft repeated rule about choosing a tripod is:

                    Light
                    Cheap
                    Rigid

                    Choose any two out of the three.

                    But - I would agree with others that question whether a tripod is really necessary with the Olynpus IBIS.

                    Jim
                    Best not to forget some of us have shaky hands either through the effect of age or medical conditions. No IBIS on the planet could cope with my hand


                    Jax

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                    • #11
                      Re: Tripods

                      Originally posted by Jax View Post
                      Best not to forget some of us have shaky hands either through the effect of age or medical conditions. No IBIS on the planet could cope with my hand


                      Jax
                      Me too, Jax
                      John

                      "A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there � even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity." ~ Robert Doisneau

                      Comment


                      • #12

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Tripods

                          Originally posted by blackfox View Post
                          Spend your money on something you will use instead

                          Horses for courses though isn't it?
                          More than 90% of my photos are using a tripod. Even though plenty of them could have been taken hand held I just don't particularly like working that way, and I almost exclusively do landscape stuff. The only time I abandon the tripod is during the deer rut.
                          Junk on Flickr
                          Even more Junk on Instagram

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                          • #14
                            Re: Tripods

                            Ah yes , but there is a BUT you have not previously owned or used a mkii as the others have pointed out it does negate the need for a tripod .. in fact the shutter button is so sensitive unless you use a remote you will probably do more harm than good ..
                            Even with the pl100-400 which only uses lens I.s a tripod is still not needed ,and among other friends that use e.mix bodies with the 300f4 plus tc I have yet to see a tripod used ..

                            But if you still feel the need just get a cheap one

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                            • #15
                              Re: Tripods

                              I rarely use a tripod 'in the field' but do use a monopod a lot. It provides a steady support that makes composition much easier than if the camera is waving about freely. It also makes panning, to follow a bird in flight, easier and steadier. It can double as a walking pole when on rough terrain.


                              I use my tripod mainly for macro photography, where it is essential when stacking images. I sometimes also use it for time-lapse photos in the garden and for astro-photography at night. Another use is for birds at the garden feeders, while I am indoors, controlling photos from my iPad.


                              On cheaper models, watch out for plastic parts, such as leg-locks, that will break with repeated use - this happened to my cheaper Manfrotto monopod and I now use a more expensive carbon fibre monopod, with metal locking components.
                              Mike
                              visit my Natural History Photos website:
                              http://www.botanicdesign.co.uk/Natur...story/home.htm

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