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Before and After?

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  • #16
    Re: Before and After?

    The Dehazer slider in Lightroom always does a good job for this sort of shot...

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    • #17
      Re: Before and After?

      Thanks Matt and MJ.

      I came to LR before the Dehaze tool so I tend not to think about it - must give it a try. We are just coming into that time of year again so if it works it will get lots of use!

      John

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      • #18
        Re: Before and After?

        And a different sort of problem - live music. The challenge with this sort of thing is that there isn't much light, what there is tends to be in the wrong places and is uneven, and there is often huge dynamic range so you have to be prepared to lose some shadows and/or highlights. I'm sure I have better examples somewhere but here is one for starters.

        Before:



        After a fairly quick edit:



        Slight crop (excuse is that I was holding the camera as high as I could and trying to frame using the back screen - not easy to see where the edges are with a dark subject and in the dark!).

        The main problem here is that the guitarist on the left and half the bassist on the right are in shadow. A grad filter for each sorts that out - +1.79 stops for the guitarist, +.97 stops for the bassist. Then an overall kick to exposure of +1.52 stops, +15 in the shadows and -49 in the highlights, but having lifted the shadows it was too light overall so -.41 stops on exposure to leave an overall adjustment of +1.11.

        You might suggest that, since I've added a stop I post-processing, the original is under-exposed. I'm not so sure. I don't attempt to rely on the meter for this sort work, with the extremes of lighting it would be too easy to fool depending on whether you happen to a backlight in the frame or not. Generally I use manual exposure, pick a rough setting (normally 1/60 at f/2 for a small venue like this) and an ISO that will be about right (3200 in this case). I can then tweak shutter and aperture it a bit - in this case I was happy to let the spotlights at the back of the stage burn out, but didn't want to burn out the white bass guitar. Normally with this stuff I find that "correct" exposure to hold the highlights results in a dark image, so using LR to increase exposure and decrease highlights gives a better overall result than more exposure in the camera.

        Although I've quoted the exposure adjustments to two decimal places, it's not really that precise - I usually just wiggle the sliders until it looks about right, while keeping an eye on the histogram as well to make sure the black and white points are still roughly where they should be. If you really need to work to .01 accuracy, LR allows you to type the values in explicitly.

        Ciao ... John

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        • #19
          Re: Before and After?

          Good stuff guys these are great. I'm not sure my version of LR has a dehaze slider. Or if it has I haven't found it yet Keep em coming.
          http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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          • #20
            Re: Before and After?

            I gave the second one a go with the dehaze slider and it's pretty amazing for a one-hit adjustment:



            Clearly it needs a bit more tweaking but it has given a very good starting point. Many thanks MJ224 for reminding me of its existence.

            I'm not sure which version of LR introduced dehaze, no doubt the info is on the web somewhere. It's quite well hidden. On the Develop panel it's under Effects, along with Post-Crop Vignetting and Grain. It is a single slider that goes from -100 to +100 and defaults to zero. On this example I just gave it +100 and no other adjustments at all.

            By the way, all my examples are processed from raw files. I reckon if you are pushing the tonal values around this much a JPEG file is likely to fall to pieces pretty quickly, although I must confess to not having tried too hard to check this.

            John

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            • #21
              Re: Before and After?

              Original JPG:


              All is not lost; there is detail in the RAW. After:
              Cameras: E-M5, E-PM2, OM40, OM4Ti
              Lenses (M.Zuiko Digital): 7-14mm/F2.8, 12-40mm/F2.8, 40-150mm/F2.8+TC1.4x, 12-50mm/F3.5-6.3, 14-42mm/F3.5-5.6 EZ, M.ZD 40-150 F4-5.6 R, 75-300mm/F4.8-6.7 Mk1, 12mm/F2, 17mm/F1.8
              Lenses (OM Zuiko): 50mm/F1.2, 24mm/F2, 35mm/F2.8 shift
              Lenses (OM Fit): Vivitar Series II 28-105mm/F2.8-3.8, Sigma 21-35mm/F3.4-4.2, Sigma 35-70mm/F2.8-4, Sigma 75-200mm/F2.8-3.5, Vivitar Series II 100-500mm/F5.6-8.0, Centon 500mm/F8 Mirror
              Learn something new every day

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              • #22
                Re: Before and After?

                Originally posted by Phill D View Post
                Good stuff guys these are great. I'm not sure my version of LR has a dehaze slider. Or if it has I haven't found it yet Keep em coming.
                Its at the bottom of the RHS tools........on mine anyway (LR6)

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                • #23
                  Re: Before and After?

                  Originally posted by Phill D View Post
                  Good stuff guys these are great. I'm not sure my version of LR has a dehaze slider. Or if it has I haven't found it yet Keep em coming.
                  If you're using the purchased version of LR6 the dehaze slider isn't included. It originated as a new feature at/around the version 6.1 update to the subscription version LR 2015CC.

                  However all is not lost. There is a free DeHaze plugin available which is easy to use. See here for details:
                  https://cutthruthefog.wordpress.com/...r-lightroom-6/
                  Last edited by Gwyver; 9th November 2017, 05:10 PM. Reason: typo
                  Chris

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                  • #24
                    Re: Before and After?

                    Thanks Chris but my CC version is only 5.7.1 so not only is there no slider but the plugin wont work either.
                    http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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                    • #25
                      "Who is watching the Watchers, watching the Watchers watching us"

                      Its not what you see, it's the way that you see it"

                      Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/photofxstudios

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                      • #26
                        Re: Before and After?

                        Excellent tipsTom thanks.
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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                        • #27
                          Re: Before and After?

                          Thanks Tom, I had forgotten about the Alt key - I just keep an eye on the histogram when adjusting but the Alt key is more graphic.

                          I gave up trying auto adjustments a long time ago - maybe the stuff I shoot just doesn't react well, but I always seemed to get awful results. Still, there's no cost in trying it and it might save a lot of work.

                          John

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                          • #28
                            Re: Before and After?

                            I find the Auto key ups the exposure and brightens the shot.

                            Not always what I feel is a good solution. But nothing lost, you can always reset...............

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                            • #29
                              Re: Before and After?

                              I suggested using the auto button primarily as a learning curve trying it out on a varied selection of images to get an idea how the sliders position themselves, its a good way of understanding the workings of Photoshop. Take for example you've taken a batch of photos of a rugby/football match under the same lighting conditions, try the auto button but then tweak the settings to suit, add noise reduction plus white balance correction and maybe dehaze slider save that out as a preset to use on all the images. It will put you in the right ballpark for the majority of images and the ones that didn't work will only take some mild tweaking. It's a time saver nobody wants to manually work on maybe two to three hundred images individually.

                              Cheers,

                              Tom
                              "Who is watching the Watchers, watching the Watchers watching us"

                              Its not what you see, it's the way that you see it"

                              Flickr http://www.flickr.com/photos/photofxstudios

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Before and After?

                                Interesting comment Tom. I tried the auto button on one shot and added a few tweaks and it worked well however I did it on the next image and it was awful...? really don't know why. I agree though when it works it's a great way to learn by looking where the sliders go. I've certainly done that for the few shots I've tried to process to date.

                                Oh btw one of your magnificent processed shots would be great on here Tom if you wouldn't mind showing a before and after
                                http://www.flickr.com/photos/flip_photo_flickr/

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